Preschool Principal/Federal Funding Coordinator

Preschool

Kentucky's preschool education programs are available for all four-year-old children whose family income is no more than 160% of poverty; all three and four-year-old children with developmental delays and disabilities, regardless of income; and other four-year- old children as placements are available based on district decision.?

The preschool program is designed to be developmentally appropriate for young children. "Developmentally appropriate" is defined in law to mean that the program focuses on the child's physical, intellectual, social and emotional development, including interpersonal, intrapersonal, and socialization skills.

Federal Funding

Title I

Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA), seeks to improve the academic achievement of the disadvantaged. Title I, Part A provides financial assistance through state educational agencies (SEAs) to local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools with high numbers or percentages of children from low-income families to ensure that all children meet challenging state academic content and achievement standards.

The district must use Title I funds only in schools that have been selected for services through allowable procedures. Funds are used to improve student achievement in high poverty schools. The Title I, Part A Handbook contains comprehensive information about all Title I requirements for districts and schools.

Title II - Supporting Effective Instruction

Title II, Part A funds are provided to districts to increase student academic achievement through strategies such as improving teacher and principal effectiveness and increasing the number of highly qualified and effective teachers in the classroom and highly qualified and effective principals and assistant principals in schools.

Title IV – Student Support and Academic Enrichment

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) was signed into law in December 2015. It reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA). Newly authorized under subpart 1 of Title IV, Part A of the ESEA, the Student Support and Academic Enrichment (SSAE) program is intended to help meet these goals by increasing the capacity of State educational agencies (SEAs), local educational agencies (LEAs), schools, and local communities to: 1) provide all students with access to a well-rounded education, 2) improve school conditions for student learning, and 3) improve the use of technology in order to improve the academic achievement and digital literacy of all students. (ESEA section 4101).

Title V – Rural Education Achievement Program (REAP)

The Rural Education Achievement Program (REAP) is designed to assist rural school districts in using federal resources more effectively to improve the quality of instruction and student academic achievement.

REAP is divided into two sections: Small Rural School Achievement (SRSA) Program and Rural Low-Income Schools (RLIS) Program.

Small Rural School Achievement (SRSA) Program

To qualify for SRSA, a school district must have an average daily attendance of less than 600 students and only serve schools with a locale code of 41, 42, or 43, as determined by the Secretary of Education, or the secretary of education has determined, based on a demonstration by the local education agency (LEA) and concurrence of the state education agency (SEA), that the LEA is located in an area defined as rural by the state.

Rural Low-Income Schools (RLIS) Program

All of the schools served by the LEA are designated with a school locale code of 41, 42, or 43, as determined by the Secretary of Education, or the secretary of education has determined, based on a demonstration by the LEA and concurrence of the SEA, that the LEA is located in a defined as rural by the state.

Documents